Reconciliation Action Plan

Our plan lays the foundation for our company's commitment to relationships, respect, and opportunities. With this plan, Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA) looks forward to leading the conversation of Reconciliation in the built environment.

We are proud to have started our first Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) three years ago in 2018, the result of 12 months of internal collaboration and external consultation with our industry. We believe our First Australians, with a history spanning 60,000 years, have deep insights into building sustainable, resilient places for people that respect the natural environment. We recognise that we are in a unique position to influence the way our industry considers reconciliation within the context of placemaking.

We take a look at some of the progress we have made with these commitments on our RAP journey.

We have developed an Indigenous Inclusion credit

In examining how the Green Star rating system can recognise and reward placemaking that honours our First Australians, we developed the ‘Indigenous Inclusion’ credit within the new Green Star Buildings rating tool. The credit requires visible and inclusive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the design and construction of a project. Comprising two pathways to achieve points, projects can target either a Reconciliation Action Plan or Incorporation of Indigenous Design.

Projects using the Reconciliation Action Plan pathway are required to have a project specific RAP of which 90% of targets are met, a key member of the project team part of the organisational RAP working group and public reporting on the RAP actions.

To target the Incorporation of Indigenous Design, projects need to use Indigenous design and planning principles that are adopted from the Australian Indigenous Design Charter:

  • Indigenous Led: Ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation in the creation of the design.
  • Community Specific: Ensure respect for the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture by following community specific cultural protocols.
  • Impact of Design: Always consider the reception and implications of all designs so that they are respectful to Indigenous culture.
  • Shared Knowledge (collaboration, co-creation, procurement): Develop and implement respectful methods for all levels of engagement and sharing of Indigenous knowledge (collaboration, co-creation, procurement).

We have a role to play as our industry’s storytellers, and to share the ideas and initiatives that are helping our members make progress on our collective journey towards reconciliation.

We are deeply inspired by the work of many of our members – Stockland and Lendlease among them – and are determined to share these stories to inspire other companies.

Stockland

Stockland

Stockland continues their reconciliation journey through the inclusion of First Nations people in their employment, education and procurement practices. Their achievements can be seen in Indigenous employment programs, Indigenous scholarships for high school students, and procurement from Indigenous suppliers to the value of $5.6 million since 2014.

More recently, they have developed the Stockland First Nations Engagement Framework (SFNEF) which provides staff with the guidance and tools for First Nations engagement activities across their projects in the areas of community consultation, cultural heritage, procurement and employment.

Lendlease

Lendlease

Lendlease aims to lift industry standards in placemaking led by the self-determination principles and voices of First Nations people. Its Elevate RAP commits Lendlease to promoting First Nations leadership within Lendlease and the community, to sharing prosperity by ensuring First Nations businesses are found throughout the supply chain, and to advocating for industry change led by First Nations voices.

We hope to spark an ongoing conversation within our industry about the importance of reconciliation, and to showcase the actions our industry can take – both practical and symbolic – to embed reconciliation into our placemaking. Our industry looks to us for leadership and we are incredibly proud of the work of our team, and of our first Reflect RAP. 

We all recognise that these are the first steps on a long journey.

A journey which will identify new opportunities to deepen the relationships, respect and trust critical to reconciliation, and to build a sustainable future where no one is left behind.

What is a Reflect RAP?

A Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) is a framework or business plan that outlines how an organisation plans to build meaningful relationships, enhance respect and promote opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The RAP framework is administered by Reconciliation Australia, which provides templates, guidance and approval of each organisation’s plan.

There are four types of RAPs: Reflect, Innovate, Stretch and Elevate. As we are just starting out on our reconciliation journey, we have developed a Reflect RAP to help us build the foundations for relationships, respect and opportunities. Our Reflect RAP is focused on raising  awareness and gaining support from our member companies, and laying the groundwork for our future commitments to cultural learning, procurement practices and reconciliation within placemaking.

Our vision for Reconciliation

In 2016, we launched a new strategic agenda and four transformative goals:

gbca rap srategic plan

Reconciliation plays an important role in helping us achieve these goals. We recognise that we have much to learn from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their love of country.

There is a clear alignment between sustainable development driven through the Green Star rating system, and the cultural beliefs, teachings and inherent connection to the land steeped in the history and day-to-day lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. We also recognise that our vision for Australia – and for liveable and sustainable communities and cities – can only be realised if we build an inclusive society that respect the rich culture of our First Australians.

  

Our first Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), a one year Reflect plan, will help us to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, develop new relationships with First Australian businesses and embed new initiatives across the organisation. There are many opportunities for our staff to learn from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, for our industry to gain insights into the sustainable planning of urban environments and to build more diverse, inclusive places for all Australians.

Our Reconciliation Actions

To reach our goals with our RAP and our commitment to reconciliation we will work toward the following actions:

Build external relationships

Develop a list of key Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and organisations within our local area or sphere of influence (sustainability and the built environment) to approach and connect with on our reconciliation journey. Actively seek to build relationships with these organisations.

Develop a list of GBCA members and like-minded organisations that have RAPs that we can approach to share experiences and learn from as we continue our reconciliation journey.

Raise internal awareness of our RAP

Develop and implement a plan to raise awareness among all staff across the organisation about our RAP commitment and engage our senior leaders in the delivery of RAP outcomes.

Organise an event for staff and members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to talk to staff and member organisations with RAPs.

Investigate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural learning and development

Implement cultural awareness training for all staff in the organisation to be delivered by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples/First Australians cultural awareness training provider.

Introduce our staff to NAIDOC Week by promoting community events in our local area.

Develop and implement a plan to raise awareness and understanding of the meaning and significance behind Acknowledgement of Country and Welcome to Country protocols (including any local cultural protocols).

Opportunities

Develop a Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Plan within our organisation.

Investigate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander supplier diversity.

   

Meet our RAP Committee